Reusability Ain't What It Used To Be

Sometimes you need a quick circuit that does one, specific thing. Other times, you want to create a general design that can be re-used in multiple instances. I’ll demonstrate the evolution from a specific to a general SKiDL design using...

Spice Simulation

I’ve added the capability to do SPICE simulations of circuits designed with SKiDL. You can read about it in this Jupyter notebook.

An Arduino With SKiDL

It’s April 1st. It’s also Arduino Day. Really. That’s not a joke. In honor of such an august occasion, I’m going to show you how to describe an Arduino board using SKiDL. It’s really easy; just takes two steps: Find...

Two Easy Pieces

I really wanted to call this post Five Easy Pieces, but I’m not Jack Nicholson and I only had two simple SKiDL designs to show. So here they are. LED Clock DougE recently posted a script that will layout a...

Don't Replicate, Automate!

I used to work during summers for a bricklayer. I learned one thing there: air conditioning is pretty good stuff. (We should do more of it.) Some people think bricklaying would be a great job, kind of like playing Tetris...

A Taste of Hierarchy

In my previous blog posts, the SKiDL circuit descriptions were flat. In this post, I’ll show a bit of how to describe a circuit hierarchically. Hierarchy is typically used when there is some subcircuit that needs to be replicated several...

Names, Not Numbers

In my previous post, I showed how to use SKiDL to describe the circuit for a simple USB-to-JTAG interface circuit. That circuit used a PIC32MX microcontroller in a 28-pin SSOP package: and the corresponding SKiDL code was: pic32 = Part(pic32_lib,...

Building a USB-to-JTAG Interface Using SKiDL

This post describes using SKiDL for a USB-to-JTAG interface that was taken all the way from concept to physically building a device. The interface is pretty simple. It’s built from the following stuff: A PIC32MX220 microcontroller. A 12 MHz crystal....